Airing on the Side of Agriculture

A Rodeo Cowboy

A RODEO COWBOY...while a student at Texas A&M University, Charlie Rankin (Emeritus and retired, KURV, Edinburg, TX) proudly displays his 60-year membership certificate from NAFB on his apartment wall in Boerne, TX. In 1947, he won the all-around title at the Texas A&M Rodeo. He was part of the group of college contestants who organized the National Intercollegiate Rodeo Association. But, he left the rodeo ring behind after

Looking Back to Move Forward

LOOKING BACK TO MOVE FORWARD…We asked Past President Janet Adkison to look back and offer her reflections as NAFB moves into 2015: 

Quicker than anticipated, 2014 came to a close.  I was warned the year serving as NAFB President would fly by and it certainly did.  As I look back at the year I believe it will always stand out as a highlight--A new home, a new job, and NAFB leadership combined into one bundle of excitement creates a memory that’s going to be hard to match.

Mum's The Word

When it comes to the family business led by Jeff Nalley (Cromwell Ag Radio Network, Utica, KY). That’s what Jeff does in his spare time when he’s taking a break from farm broadcasting. “I grew up on a farm that fell in the 80’s crisis. That led me to radio. I wanted the kids to have some ‘hands-on’ experience with growing crops and marketing. We started with both mums and strawberries. Now we’re down to just mums. The weather isn’t favorable for a commercial strawberry business with our soil type and location. We started with just 250 mums. We’re well over that mark now.” Hot weather in June killed about 10 percent of their early plants.

2014 NAFB Foundation Recipients

During the 71st NAFB Convention three college students were award the 2014 NAFB Foundation Scholarships.


Left to right, Liz Koehler (Illinois), Joel Penhorwood (Ohio),
and Shannon Yokely (Missouri) are recipients of $5,000
NAFB Foundation scholarships named after legendary
NAFB members: Glen Kummerow, George Logan and
Orion Samuelson.

 

Farm Broadcaster of The Year

“What a tremendous honor it was for me to receive the 2014 Farm Broadcaster of the Year Award,” Ken Anderson (Brownfield Network, Lincoln, NE) said after the November convention in Kansas City. “I attended my first NAFB Convention in 1977, at the ripe old age of 22, and have watched many great farm broadcasters receive this prestigious award over the years.”

Horizon Award Winner

Nicole Heslip (Michigan Farm Radio Network, East Lansing, MI) said she enjoys being a spokesperson for agriculture. “With less than two million farmers in the nation, I whole heartedly believe not only farmers, but family, friends and agribusiness professionals need to do their part in sharing the agricultural story. I love what my family has done on the farm. Being someone who speaks not only for my family but also for the industry is an amazing opportunity.” 

Farm & Ranch News Award

Bill Zortman (KELO/KELQ, Sioux Falls, SD) was recognized for his diligent coverage of farm and ranch news by the South Dakota Farmers Union during their 99th convention held November 20-21 in Aberdeen.

Army Recruiting in Oklahoma

AAaron Corbetaron Corbet, former NAFB Member Services staff member, has begun a new career in Army recruiting in Oklahoma. “Things are going great for us. We have almost fully settled in Bartlesville, OK, home of Phillips 66.

New Host for U.S. Farm Report

John Phipps announced on the final show in September that the program is transitioning to a new host. Tyne Morgan will take over the helm starting this weekend. Morgan said, “John will still be on the show each week; he’s just doing so from his farm.

Seeing Soybean Checkoff Dollars At Work in Panama and Ecuador

Meghan Grebner (Brownfield Ag News, Fishers, IN) returned August 22 from travel with a group of young farmers to Panama and Ecuador to see their soybean checkoff dollars at work. The annual See For Yourself Tour is sponsored by the United Soybean Board. Participants represented a variety of agricultural regions, but shared at least one common bond – soybeans. To put this in perspective, Meghan said, “A recent study from Texas A&M showed that for every $1 that goes into the soybean checkoff, a farmer sees a $5.20 return on investment.”

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